Friday, December 24, 2010

The Many Names of Rus

The Russian state, in one form or another, has been in existence for the better part of 1,400 years, starting as a confederation of tribes: Slavic, Ugric and one Norse, and proceeding into the biggest empire humanity has ever known. In our long existence, we have known many enemies, most have tried to invade us and found only their own ruin and some out right destruction.

However, over the millennium, many of our vanquished foes were not destroyed, but simply slinked off like whipped curs and rethought their tactics. One of these, which at present has born great fruit, has been to split us up and create false identities for our peoples.

This has taken the form in breaking the historic chain of the Rus which saw our capital first in Novgorod, then in Kiev, later contested between Moscow, Vladimir and Novgorod solidifying in Moscow, then moving to the newly created St.Peterburg and finally returning to Moscow.

Our enemies have sought to seperate our historic and unfettered chain by making a seemingly subtle but devastating suggestion that Moscow, in the form of Moscovy, was or is not part of the Rus. As if, as has been picked up by the Western Ukrainians, who themselves are more Polish or Romanian then eastern Slavic Rus, Moscow was some alien Asian power that came along or grew up out of nothing and swallowed up the remnants of the Rus. Never mind the city was established and ever only ruled by Russians and that until the death of Feador, Ivan Grozny's retarded son, there was an unbroken line to Rurik, the first Rus prince.

As a rather learned scholar of Russia, Michael Averko put it:

As someone noted to me, "Kievan Rus" and "Muscovy" are politicized terms used to deflate the idea that the Rus state was seeing a shift in stature from Kiev to Moscow before the Mongol occupation.

There has been an effort to deflate as much as possible the idea that the post Mongol occupied Rus territory saw Moscow as the lead city of the liberated Rus territory - which then became occupied by others thereafter. Instead, the image of "Muscovy' is suggestively presented as something that's not as related to Rus. There's plenty of evidence to contradict this contention. Such matter has been generally overlooked by North American Ukrainian Studies programs and some court appointed Russia friendly types not so well versed in the history.

The Oranges, those rotten Western fruits, tossed out by the Ukrainian electorates, even went as far, with American monies, of course, to build a new museum of Ukrainian history or rather "Rus" history, minus Russia....of course this created a few serious problems: like the lack of the cities of Novgorod, Nizhni Novgorod, Moscow, Vladimir, Pskov, Samara and many others being part of that history, leaving a rather Swiss cheese effect on history.

Only through a strong historical resilience and strength, as well as continuity, can we hope to not only preserve who we are, in the face of endless cultural barbarianism of Anglo mass media, but to, against all the will of that evil elite, reunite our people into one single Slavic Rus stock of Orthodox faith, and shine as a beacon to all Slavic as well as Orthodox peoples (Greeks, Romanians, Ethiopians, Kenyans, Armenians and so on), as well as push back the Anglo financed and backed Islamic Jihadist hordes.


Agent Chameleon said...

It needs to be made clear to these "pro-American" western Ukrainians that the West doesn't give a damn about Ukraine or Ukrainian nationalism. The same Western intellectuals cheerleading Ukrainian nationalism support mass immigration and propositional identity, meaning that if the West has its way, ANYONE can be "Ukrainian". In the end, Ukrainian nationalism won't matter, since it will be sucked into the EU Borg if the globalists aren't removed from Kiev.

Rusty Mason said...

Remember your history. Westerners have completely forgotten theirs, and a false one has been installed in its place and no one noticed. A nation without a historical memory is like a man without a memory -- nothing.